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The Reece Grant has awarded $5,000 to its first HVAC-R project, aiding the installation of air conditioning and ventilation in a specialised mental health facility for individuals recovering from eating disorders (ED).

Since its inception in 2016, the Reece Grant has supported more than 15 projects in communities abroad, 10 local initiatives and is currently supporting 8 up and coming young people studying a trade. With a commitment to creating a better future for the next generation, the Reece Grant funds initiatives that improve health and sanitation, community wellbeing and education. While many of the projects to date have been focused on plumbing initiatives, this is the first successful HVAC-R recipient, with a view to continue to expand the reach of these valuable skills in aid of people in need.

The deserving recipient, Daine Smith, was put in touch with the organisation, endED, through his Sunshine Coast branch. EndED is an organisation dedicated to support and healing for ED patients. Co-founders Mark and Gayle Forbes are eagerly anticipating the completion of its dedicated premises on the Sunshine Coast, the first of its kind in Australia. The National Eating Disorders Collaboration (NEDC) estimates that at least 16% of Australians suffer from eating disorders and disordered eating. Facilities such as these represent the opportunity to support and help rehabilitate a little over four million Australians grappling with a sickness that causes a whole host of societal and psychological problems. 


“I hope to send in five to six guys on site, and our part of the work should take three to five weeks,” says Daine. “Everyone’s really excited to be part of this and to see the completed facility. It’s brilliant to know we’ll have contributed to a great end result and I’d love to see how we can continue helping in the future.”

It’s important for Daine and his team to be involved in projects that make a difference. “Knowing that ED patients often find themselves in mental health facilities where the environment really isn’t conducive to healing specific to their unique situations really saddens me,” says Daine. “I’m looking forward to seeing the change a dedicated space makes in their lives.” Learn more about current Reece Grant recipients and how their projects are making a difference at reecegrant.com.au

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